Issues of Capacity and Decision-Making in the Context of Delirium Decision-making capacity is a fundamental consideration in working with patients in a clinical setting. One of the most common conditions affecting decision-making capacity in patients in the inpatient or long-term care setting is a form of acute, transient cognitive change known as delirium. A thorough understanding of delirium — how ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2015
Issues of Capacity and Decision-Making in the Context of Delirium
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kevin R. Patterson
    Section of Psycho-oncology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Financial Disclosure: Kevin R. Patterson is an assistant professor of psychiatry and medicine at the University of Pittsburgh.
    Financial Disclosure: Kevin R. Patterson is an assistant professor of psychiatry and medicine at the University of Pittsburgh.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Kevin R. Patterson has previously published in the subject area.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Kevin R. Patterson has previously published in the subject area.×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2015
Issues of Capacity and Decision-Making in the Context of Delirium
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 2015, Vol. 24, 140-145. doi:10.1044/sasd24.4.140
History: Received May 21, 2015 , Revised July 21, 2015 , Accepted July 29, 2015
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 2015, Vol. 24, 140-145. doi:10.1044/sasd24.4.140
History: Received May 21, 2015; Revised July 21, 2015; Accepted July 29, 2015

Decision-making capacity is a fundamental consideration in working with patients in a clinical setting. One of the most common conditions affecting decision-making capacity in patients in the inpatient or long-term care setting is a form of acute, transient cognitive change known as delirium. A thorough understanding of delirium — how it can present, its predisposing and precipitating factors, and how it can be managed — will improve a speech-language pathologist's (SLPs) ability to make treatment recommendations, and to advise the treatment team on issues related to communication and patient autonomy.

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