Informed Consent in Clinical and Research Settings: What Do Patients and Families Need to Make Informed Decisions? Informed consent requires that patients in clinical settings and participants in research voluntarily agree to a proposed plan based on their understanding of a clear and thorough explanation of purpose, risks, benefits, and alternatives. Although the need to obtain informed consent is well understood in clinical and research environments, the ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2015
Informed Consent in Clinical and Research Settings: What Do Patients and Families Need to Make Informed Decisions?
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Helen M. Sharp
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI
  • Financial Disclosure: Helen M. Sharp is an associate professor at Western Michigan University.
    Financial Disclosure: Helen M. Sharp is an associate professor at Western Michigan University.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Helen M. Sharp has previously published in the subject area.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Helen M. Sharp has previously published in the subject area.×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2015
Informed Consent in Clinical and Research Settings: What Do Patients and Families Need to Make Informed Decisions?
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 2015, Vol. 24, 130-139. doi:10.1044/sasd24.4.130
History: Received May 1, 2015 , Revised July 28, 2015 , Accepted July 28, 2015
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 2015, Vol. 24, 130-139. doi:10.1044/sasd24.4.130
History: Received May 1, 2015; Revised July 28, 2015; Accepted July 28, 2015

Informed consent requires that patients in clinical settings and participants in research voluntarily agree to a proposed plan based on their understanding of a clear and thorough explanation of purpose, risks, benefits, and alternatives. Although the need to obtain informed consent is well understood in clinical and research environments, the evidence suggests that patients, family members, and participants in research are often unclear about options, risks, and benefits even after providing “informed” consent. Individuals with communication or cognitive disorders are at particular risk for a suboptimal outcome of the informed consent process. There are many barriers to achieving true informed consent, but the use of appropriate strategies can minimize the impact of these barriers and allow clinicians and researchers to improve the process of achieving true informed consent.

Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia) content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.