Re-emergence of Surgery in the Management of Head & Neck Cancer The term “head and neck cancer” (HNC) refers to a group of tumours which may arise from multiple different anatomical sites including the oral cavity, nasopharynx, oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx, upper oesophagus, nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, and salivary glands. Over 90% of malignancies in the head and neck are squamous ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2015
Re-emergence of Surgery in the Management of Head & Neck Cancer
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David Hamilton
    Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals, United Kingdom
  • Muhammad Khan
    Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals, United Kingdom
  • James O'Hara
    Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals, United Kingdom
  • Vinidh Paleri
    Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals, United Kingdom
  • Financial Disclosure: David Hamilton is academic clinical lecturer at Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals. Muhammad Khan is clinical fellow at Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals. James O'Hara is consultant surgeon, otolaryngology-head and neck surgery at Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals. Vinidh Paleri is professor of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery at Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals.
    Financial Disclosure: David Hamilton is academic clinical lecturer at Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals. Muhammad Khan is clinical fellow at Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals. James O'Hara is consultant surgeon, otolaryngology-head and neck surgery at Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals. Vinidh Paleri is professor of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery at Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: David Hamilton has previously published in the subject area. Muhammad Khan has previously published in the subject area. James O'Hara has previously published in the subject area. Vinidh Paleri has previously published in the subject area.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: David Hamilton has previously published in the subject area. Muhammad Khan has previously published in the subject area. James O'Hara has previously published in the subject area. Vinidh Paleri has previously published in the subject area.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2015
Re-emergence of Surgery in the Management of Head & Neck Cancer
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), June 2015, Vol. 24, 79-88. doi:10.1044/sasd24.3.79
History: Received December 15, 2014 , Revised March 19, 2015 , Accepted March 29, 2015
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), June 2015, Vol. 24, 79-88. doi:10.1044/sasd24.3.79
History: Received December 15, 2014; Revised March 19, 2015; Accepted March 29, 2015
The term “head and neck cancer” (HNC) refers to a group of tumours which may arise from multiple different anatomical sites including the oral cavity, nasopharynx, oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx, upper oesophagus, nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, and salivary glands. Over 90% of malignancies in the head and neck are squamous cell carcinomas (Health & Social Care Information Centre [HSCIC], 2012). The survival associated with HNC is around 65% but varies globally (WHO, 2008): just over 20% of patients die within a year of treatment and 30% die within two years (HSCIC, 2012). Curative treatment of HNC is difficult to achieve, and often requires radical treatment regimens which have a profound effects on a patient's quality of life (QoL), most notably swallow and voice function. The available treatments can be broadly divided into surgical and non-surgical regimes. When choosing which treatment is best, a patient and clinician need to consider important trade-offs between survival and function; the selected treatment can affect aesthetics, communication, nutrition, and psychosocial functioning. The debate about which treatment provides the best chance of cure, local control, functional outcome, and QoL has been ongoing for decades: the emergence of novel, minimally invasive surgical techniques, together with a modernisation in the delivery of radiotherapy (RT) treatment has added complexity to this debate.
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