Understanding Image Resolution and Quality in Videofluoroscopy Current best practice recommendations for videofluoroscopic swallowing studies (VFSS) suggest that fluoroscopy should be performed either on a continuous setting or at 30 pulses per second (pps). Image capture should likewise be set to maximum resolution (i.e., 30 frames per second [fps]). In this article, we discuss choices in technical ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2015
Understanding Image Resolution and Quality in Videofluoroscopy
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Melanie Peladeau-Pigeon
    University Health Network, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Toronto, Canada
  • Catriona Steele
    University Health Network, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Toronto, Canada
    Department of Speech Language Pathology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
    Holland Bloorview Kids Rehab, Bloorview Research Institute, Toronto, Canada
  • Financial Disclosure: Melanie Peladeau-Pigeon is clinical research coordinator at Toronto Rehabilitation Institute. Catriona Steele is senior scientist at Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, a professor at the University of Toronto, cross-appointed scientist at Bloorview Research Institute, and acknowledges funding from the National Institutes of Health, the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, Nestle Health Sciences, Bioblast Pharma Inc., and Bracco Canada.
    Financial Disclosure: Melanie Peladeau-Pigeon is clinical research coordinator at Toronto Rehabilitation Institute. Catriona Steele is senior scientist at Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, a professor at the University of Toronto, cross-appointed scientist at Bloorview Research Institute, and acknowledges funding from the National Institutes of Health, the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, Nestle Health Sciences, Bioblast Pharma Inc., and Bracco Canada.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Melanie Peladeau-Pigeon has previously published in the subject area. Catriona Steele has previously published in the subject area. A portion of the results contained in this article were presented at the 2015 Dysphagia Research Society conference held in Chicago.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Melanie Peladeau-Pigeon has previously published in the subject area. Catriona Steele has previously published in the subject area. A portion of the results contained in this article were presented at the 2015 Dysphagia Research Society conference held in Chicago.×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2015
Understanding Image Resolution and Quality in Videofluoroscopy
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), June 2015, Vol. 24, 115-124. doi:10.1044/sasd24.3.115
History: Received March 30, 2015 , Revised April 23, 2015 , Accepted April 23, 2015
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), June 2015, Vol. 24, 115-124. doi:10.1044/sasd24.3.115
History: Received March 30, 2015; Revised April 23, 2015; Accepted April 23, 2015

Current best practice recommendations for videofluoroscopic swallowing studies (VFSS) suggest that fluoroscopy should be performed either on a continuous setting or at 30 pulses per second (pps). Image capture should likewise be set to maximum resolution (i.e., 30 frames per second [fps]). In this article, we discuss choices in technical settings that may result in the output of fewer than 30 unique images per second or result in image distortions. We also describe a test that can be used to confirm image capture quality and rate using an analog metronome. Clinicians and researchers need to be aware of these issues and the limitations they bring to videofluoroscopy review and analysis.

Acknowledgments
The authors would like to thank Melanie Tapson for her assistance in data collection and analysis from and Ka Lun Tam for his assistance in development of the metronome test.
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