Value of Qualitative Research in Dysphagia in the Head and Neck Cancer Patient Population- the Caregiver's Perspective/Experience Treatments for head and neck cancer (HNC) have evolved over time, resulting in an increase in outpatient delivery and shorter hospital stays. Head and neck cancer (HNC) patients experience major changes to basic functions, increasing their dependency on others. With this in mind, the demands placed on family members as ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2015
Value of Qualitative Research in Dysphagia in the Head and Neck Cancer Patient Population- the Caregiver's Perspective/Experience
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joanne Patterson
    Institute for Health and Society, Newcastle University, United Kingdom
  • Financial Disclosure: Joanne Patterson is NIHR clinical lecturer at Newcastle University.
    Financial Disclosure: Joanne Patterson is NIHR clinical lecturer at Newcastle University.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Joanne Patterson has previously published in the subject area.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Joanne Patterson has previously published in the subject area.×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2015
Value of Qualitative Research in Dysphagia in the Head and Neck Cancer Patient Population- the Caregiver's Perspective/Experience
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), June 2015, Vol. 24, 107-114. doi:10.1044/sasd24.3.107
History: Received December 15, 2014 , Revised February 10, 2015 , Accepted February 14, 2015
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), June 2015, Vol. 24, 107-114. doi:10.1044/sasd24.3.107
History: Received December 15, 2014; Revised February 10, 2015; Accepted February 14, 2015

Treatments for head and neck cancer (HNC) have evolved over time, resulting in an increase in outpatient delivery and shorter hospital stays. Head and neck cancer (HNC) patients experience major changes to basic functions, increasing their dependency on others. With this in mind, the demands placed on family members as carers has increased in complexity and intensity, for which they may have just minimal preparation. Caring for someone with dysphagia presents with specific issues relating to adherence to advice, patient safety, and patient adjustment to their altered self. In addition to this, carers are often coming to terms with major changes to their lifestyle, adjusting to their new role, and dealing with their partner's diagnosis of cancer. Despite its importance, there is minimal research in the field with the burden of care being little understood from this perspective. When issues are not clearly defined, an exploratory research approach is required, which is best conducted using qualitative methodology. Qualitative papers show a number of common themes surrounding the HNC carers' perspective on dysphagia. More work is required to further explore this emerging field with development of ways in which they can be best supported.

Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia) content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.