Lung Volumes and Their Significance for Pharyngeal and Esophageal Swallowing Function Subglottic airway pressure is generated during each swallow and this supports the probability that subglottic mechanoreceptors function as part of the overall afferent collage of signals that guide motor output. Lung volume at swallow onset, lung recoil forces, and chest wall compliance are all important factors that combine for the ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2014
Lung Volumes and Their Significance for Pharyngeal and Esophageal Swallowing Function
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Roxann Diez Gross
    Children's Institute of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Roxann Diez Gross

    Financial Disclosure: Roxann Diez Gross is the Director of Research at Children's Institute of Pittsburgh. She also receives grant funding from the Prader-Willi Association USA and the Inflammation Research Foundation.

    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Roxann Diez Gross has previously published in the subject area.

Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Article
Article   |   June 01, 2014
Lung Volumes and Their Significance for Pharyngeal and Esophageal Swallowing Function
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), June 2014, Vol. 23, 91-99. doi:10.1044/sasd23.3.91
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), June 2014, Vol. 23, 91-99. doi:10.1044/sasd23.3.91

Subglottic airway pressure is generated during each swallow and this supports the probability that subglottic mechanoreceptors function as part of the overall afferent collage of signals that guide motor output. Lung volume at swallow onset, lung recoil forces, and chest wall compliance are all important factors that combine for the generation of sufficiently positive subglottic air pressure during the pharyngeal swallow. Higher lung volumes at swallow onset may also be advantageous to the esophageal pressure gradient during esophageal bolus transit. Patients with impaired lung-thoracic unit recoil and disordered breathing/swallowing patterns may not only benefit from learning to swallow during early exhalation, but may also need to start at a higher lung volume in order to compensate for reduced recoil effects on swallowing function.

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