Noninvasive Brain Stimulation in Swallowing Rehabilitation: How Can the Evidence Base Inform Practice? Since the advent of noninvasive brain stimulation (NBS) techniques, rehabilitation sciences have produced a growing body of evidence demonstrating that experimentally induced neuroplastic reorganization may aid the recovery of motor function following brain damage. Emerging evidence suggests that NBS may, in the future, also be useful to aid the recovery ... Article
Article  |   February 01, 2014
Noninvasive Brain Stimulation in Swallowing Rehabilitation: How Can the Evidence Base Inform Practice?
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sebastian Doeltgen
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Flinders University, Australia
  • Financial Disclosure: Sebastian Doeltgen is a Lecturer at Flinders University.
    Financial Disclosure: Sebastian Doeltgen is a Lecturer at Flinders University.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Sebastian Doeltgen has previously published in the subject area.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Sebastian Doeltgen has previously published in the subject area.×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Articles
Article   |   February 01, 2014
Noninvasive Brain Stimulation in Swallowing Rehabilitation: How Can the Evidence Base Inform Practice?
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), February 2014, Vol. 23, 15-22. doi:10.1044/sasd23.1.15
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), February 2014, Vol. 23, 15-22. doi:10.1044/sasd23.1.15

Since the advent of noninvasive brain stimulation (NBS) techniques, rehabilitation sciences have produced a growing body of evidence demonstrating that experimentally induced neuroplastic reorganization may aid the recovery of motor function following brain damage. Emerging evidence suggests that NBS may, in the future, also be useful to aid the recovery of swallowing function, in particular following stroke. This commentary highlights the currently available research and discusses its implications within a framework of evidence-based practice (EBP). It aims to offer some thoughts for consideration relating to the pragmatic conundrum of being urged to implement novel interventions into clinical practice while scientific research is still in the process of building a body of external research evidence.

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