SLP's Role in Evaluation and Treatment of Cough Function Our understanding of airway protection is evolving to encompass multiple behaviors, including both swallowing and cough. The anatomical structures involved in cough production are familiar to most speech-language pathologists (SLPs), as they overlap with those involved with the functions of voice and swallowing. Cough function and dysfunction, or chronic cough, ... Article
Article  |   November 01, 2013
SLP's Role in Evaluation and Treatment of Cough Function
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karen Hegland
    Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, University of Florida Gainesville, FL
  • Christine Sapienza
    Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, University of Florida Gainesville, FL
  • Financial Disclosure: Karen Hegland is an Assistant Professor at the University of Florida. Christine Sapienza is the Associate Dean in the College of Health Sciences and the Program Director of Speech Language Pathology in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Florida. She is also a Research Career Specialist at the Malcom Randall VA hospital in Gainesville, Florida.
    Financial Disclosure: Karen Hegland is an Assistant Professor at the University of Florida. Christine Sapienza is the Associate Dean in the College of Health Sciences and the Program Director of Speech Language Pathology in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Florida. She is also a Research Career Specialist at the Malcom Randall VA hospital in Gainesville, Florida.×
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Karen Hegland has previously published in the subject area. Christine Sapienza has previously published in the subject area.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Karen Hegland has previously published in the subject area. Christine Sapienza has previously published in the subject area.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   November 01, 2013
SLP's Role in Evaluation and Treatment of Cough Function
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), November 2013, Vol. 22, 85-93. doi:10.1044/sasd22.3.85
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), November 2013, Vol. 22, 85-93. doi:10.1044/sasd22.3.85

Our understanding of airway protection is evolving to encompass multiple behaviors, including both swallowing and cough. The anatomical structures involved in cough production are familiar to most speech-language pathologists (SLPs), as they overlap with those involved with the functions of voice and swallowing. Cough function and dysfunction, or chronic cough, has traditionally focused on too much coughing. However too little cough, or absence of a reflex cough response, is the more concerning in terms of the ability to protect the airway. Currently, cough effectiveness is typically evaluated based on cough airflows. There is a growing body of literature that provides expected values for various measures of cough airflow and data to suggest these airflows are reduced or absent with various neurologic or anatomical disorders. The goal of this article is to define different types of cough, review the anatomy and physiology of coughing, define how coughing is measured, describe what may go wrong with cough production, and demonstrate how cough function can be improved. A short case study is then presented.

Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia) content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.