Treatment of Dysphagia in the Schools: Three Case Studies In order for children to learn, they must be safe when eating at school, and they must also have adequate nutrition and hydration. According to Logemann (1998), the symptoms of swallowing disorders include, but are not limited to, controlling food or saliva in the mouth; coughing before, during, and/or ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2003
Treatment of Dysphagia in the Schools: Three Case Studies
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Emily M. Homer
    St. Tammany Parish Schools, Covington, LA
  • Nicole Beauxis
    St. Tammany Parish Schools, Covington, LA
  • Alice Fish-Finnegan
    St. Tammany Parish Schools, Covington, LA
  • Emily Homer is assistant coordinator of the Speech-Language Therapy Program with St. Tammany Parish school system in Covington, LA. Nicole Beauxis and Alice Fish-Finnegan are speech-language pathologists with the St. Tammany Parish school system
    Emily Homer is assistant coordinator of the Speech-Language Therapy Program with St. Tammany Parish school system in Covington, LA. Nicole Beauxis and Alice Fish-Finnegan are speech-language pathologists with the St. Tammany Parish school system×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / School-Based Settings / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2003
Treatment of Dysphagia in the Schools: Three Case Studies
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), March 2003, Vol. 12, 20-26. doi:10.1044/sasd12.1.20
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), March 2003, Vol. 12, 20-26. doi:10.1044/sasd12.1.20
In order for children to learn, they must be safe when eating at school, and they must also have adequate nutrition and hydration. According to Logemann (1998), the symptoms of swallowing disorders include, but are not limited to, controlling food or saliva in the mouth; coughing before, during, and/or after a swallow; frequent coughing toward the end or immediately after a meal; recurring pneumonia; weight loss when no other reason can be defined; and “gurgled voice quality.” Children with serious health issues, which include the signs and symptoms of dysphagia, are being fed in school systems every day. Sheppard (2001)  offers a compelling narrative on the merits and complexities of dysphagia treatment in the public schools. School systems are debating the necessity of treating dysphagia in the schools. It could be argued that addressing dysphagia in schools is necessary in order to:
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