Plasticity in the Human Motor System It is well recognized that the number and effectiveness of synapses in the adult brain changes in response to learning and that similar processes contribute to the restoration of function after central nervous system damage. It is possible to use non-invasive methods of brain stimulation in humans (transcranial magnetic stimulation, ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2010
Plasticity in the Human Motor System
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John C Rothwell
    UCL Institute of NeurologyLondon, England
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2010
Plasticity in the Human Motor System
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), March 2010, Vol. 19, 10-15. doi:10.1044/sasd19.1.10
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), March 2010, Vol. 19, 10-15. doi:10.1044/sasd19.1.10
Abstract

It is well recognized that the number and effectiveness of synapses in the adult brain changes in response to learning and that similar processes contribute to the restoration of function after central nervous system damage. It is possible to use non-invasive methods of brain stimulation in humans (transcranial magnetic stimulation, TMS; or transcranial direct current stimulation, TDCS) to study and even manipulate these processes. Initial studies now are underway to test whether modification of synaptic plasticity by neurostimulation can improve recovery of motor function in patients after stroke.

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