Dysphagia Management in the Schools: Concepts in Training and Competency As the demands to care for children with swallowing and feeding disorders continue to evolve for school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs), avenues to establish, maintain, and monitor competency are imperative. Optimally, these approaches should delineate dysphagia protocols and practices at school, district, and state levels that are grounded in evidence. Key ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2009
Dysphagia Management in the Schools: Concepts in Training and Competency
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cynthia R. O'Donoghue
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA
  • Sarah E. Hegyi
    Harrisonburg, VA
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / School-Based Settings / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2009
Dysphagia Management in the Schools: Concepts in Training and Competency
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 2009, Vol. 18, 103-108. doi:10.1044/sasd18.3.103
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 2009, Vol. 18, 103-108. doi:10.1044/sasd18.3.103
Abstract

As the demands to care for children with swallowing and feeding disorders continue to evolve for school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs), avenues to establish, maintain, and monitor competency are imperative. Optimally, these approaches should delineate dysphagia protocols and practices at school, district, and state levels that are grounded in evidence. Key foundational components to improving services for children, while minimizing the liabilities for SLPs, include legislated scope of practice within school licensure regulations, published guidelines and standard of practice protocols, documented yearly competencies, and established monitoring for knowledge and skill levels. This article outlines the Commonwealth of Virginia's approaches to these goals as a preliminary model to address these logistical issues. Although a concept not reported previously in the school-based swallowing and feeding literature, a continuum of knowledge and skills is considered. This continuum emphasizes acquired skills do not mean “competency” for life. Competency is dynamic; SLPs will advance or regress in their performances based on personal interests, continuing education, and clinical experiences.

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