Food for Thought on Pediatric Feeding and Swallowing “Food for Thought” provides an opportunity for review of pertinent topics to add to updates in areas of concern for professionals involved with feeding and swallowing issues in infants and children. Given the frequency with which speech-language pathologists (SLPs) make decisions to alter feedings when young infants demonstrate silent aspiration ... Viewpoint
Viewpoint  |   October 01, 2008
Food for Thought on Pediatric Feeding and Swallowing
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joan C. Arvedson
    Children's Hospital of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Medical College of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Food for Thought
Viewpoint   |   October 01, 2008
Food for Thought on Pediatric Feeding and Swallowing
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 2008, Vol. 17, 110-118. doi:10.1044/sasd17.3.110
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 2008, Vol. 17, 110-118. doi:10.1044/sasd17.3.110
Abstract

“Food for Thought” provides an opportunity for review of pertinent topics to add to updates in areas of concern for professionals involved with feeding and swallowing issues in infants and children. Given the frequency with which speech-language pathologists (SLPs) make decisions to alter feedings when young infants demonstrate silent aspiration on videofluoroscopic swallow studies (VFSS), the need for increased understanding about cough and its development/maturation is a high priority. In addition, understanding of the role(s) of laryngeal chemoreflexes (LCRs), relationships (or lack of relationships) between cough and esophagitis, gastroesophageal reflux (GER), and chronic salivary aspiration is critical. Decision making regarding management must take into account multiple systems and their interactions in order to provide safe feeding for all children to meet nutrition and hydration needs without being at risk for pulmonary problems. The responsibility is huge and should encourage all to search the literature so that clinical practice is as evidence-based as possible; this often requires adequate understanding of developmentally appropriate neurophysiology and function.

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