Editor's Corner The authors of the articles in this June 2008 issue of Perspectives offer updates on key elements that we must consider when we plan and/or evaluate the effects of dysphagia treatment. As practicing clinicians, we are regularly faced with determining the appropriateness of the treatments we provide while In ... Editorial
Editorial  |   June 01, 2008
Editor's Corner
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Teresa C. Brobeck
    Program in Communication Disorders, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Editorial
Editorial   |   June 01, 2008
Editor's Corner
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), June 2008, Vol. 17, 41-42. doi:10.1044/sasd17.2.41
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), June 2008, Vol. 17, 41-42. doi:10.1044/sasd17.2.41
The authors of the articles in this June 2008 issue of Perspectives offer updates on key elements that we must consider when we plan and/or evaluate the effects of dysphagia treatment. As practicing clinicians, we are regularly faced with determining the appropriateness of the treatments we provide while
In this issue, Jim Coyle provides an introductory piece that outlines strategies the practicing clinician can use to function more effectively as a research consumer. Following this, Chris Sapienza, Karen Wheeler-Hegland, Kim Stewart, and Joe Nocera discuss key factors related to treatment intensity and treatment duration that must be considered when we design and/or provide direct and indirect treatments in dysphagia therapy. To assist us with exploring methods for treatment comparison and to examine both positive and negative effects of our treatments, Jo Anne Robbins and Jackie Hind provide an overview of the largest randomized clinical trial ever completed in dysphagia. They report on this study that involved comparing two commonly used dysphagia treatment interventions: the chin-tuck posture and thickened liquids. Finally, Paul Cooke explores various strategies that may be implemented by clinicians and caregivers to facilitate improving oral intake while still promoting the autonomy of patients with dysphagia. I’d like to thank all of our authors for sharing their knowledge and expertise with our readers.
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