Food for Thought Importance of a Clinical Exam/Cranial Nerve Assessment Food for Thought
Food for Thought  |   December 2012
Food for Thought
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Giselle Carnaby
    Department of Behavioral Science & Community Health, College of Public Health & Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
  • Disclosure: Giselle Carnaby has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Giselle Carnaby has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders
Food for Thought   |   December 2012
Food for Thought
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), December 2012, Vol. 21, 143-149. doi:10.1044/sasd21.4.143
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), December 2012, Vol. 21, 143-149. doi:10.1044/sasd21.4.143

The clinical dysphagia examination is the mainstay of evaluation methods for the working speech-language pathologist (SLP). It is cheap, accessible, simple to deliver, and consumes few resources (Carnaby-Mann & Lenius, 2008). Though it has often been criticized for its validity in comparison to the more costly videofluoroscopic assessment, it remains the “working SLP’s” best friend when initially confronted with a patient’s complaint of difficulty swallowing. This article will review the misconceptions related to the value of the clinical dysphagia assessment, and the role of the cranial nerve review component in the examination and, more broadly, in patient evaluation, care, and treatment planning.

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