Guillain-Barre Syndrome and Disordered Swallowing Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is an immune-based disorder of the peripheral nervous system. Cranial nerve involvement and dysphagia is experienced by individuals with clinical presentations of GBS. The neuromuscular deterioration can proceed quite rapidly, over a period of days or even hours. Speech and voice impairment accompanies some forms of GBS, ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2012
Guillain-Barre Syndrome and Disordered Swallowing
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marta Kazandjian
    Silvercrest Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation, New York Hospital Queens, Queens, NY
  • Karen Dikeman
    Silvercrest Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation, New York Hospital Queens, Queens, NY
  • Disclosure: Marta Kazandjian and Karen Dikeman have no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Marta Kazandjian and Karen Dikeman have no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders
Article   |   December 01, 2012
Guillain-Barre Syndrome and Disordered Swallowing
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), December 2012, Vol. 21, 115-120. doi:10.1044/sasd21.4.115
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), December 2012, Vol. 21, 115-120. doi:10.1044/sasd21.4.115

Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is an immune-based disorder of the peripheral nervous system. Cranial nerve involvement and dysphagia is experienced by individuals with clinical presentations of GBS. The neuromuscular deterioration can proceed quite rapidly, over a period of days or even hours. Speech and voice impairment accompanies some forms of GBS, beginning with a mild dysarthria, progressing in some cases to anarthria or total loss of speech production. Respiration and swallowing are commonly affected and account for much of the mortality with the disease. Long-term ventilator support and alternate feeding methods are often required when unresolved respiratory impairment occurs. The majority of patients with GBS will have a return in function and demonstrate full recovery. The role of the speech-language pathologist is instrumental in managing both swallowing and communication deficits and assisting recovery throughout the continuum of care.

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