Apraxia in Dementia: Impact on Oral Intake Dementia is defined as a decline from a prior level of cognitive-behavioral function and is commonly associated with deficits in learned skilled movements (i.e., apraxia). Specifically, patients with Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of degenerative dementia, frequently have problems with manipulating and using tools, such as using a fork ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2012
Apraxia in Dementia: Impact on Oral Intake
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anne L. Foundas
    Brain & Behavior Program, Department of Neurology, Cell Biology & Anatomy, LSU Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA
  • Jessica A. Shields
    Brain & Behavior Program, Department of Neurology, Cell Biology & Anatomy, LSU Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA
  • Disclosure: Anne L. Foundas has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Anne L. Foundas has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Disclosure: Jessica A. Shields has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Jessica A. Shields has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2012
Apraxia in Dementia: Impact on Oral Intake
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 2012, Vol. 21, 85-90. doi:10.1044/sasd21.3.85
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 2012, Vol. 21, 85-90. doi:10.1044/sasd21.3.85

Dementia is defined as a decline from a prior level of cognitive-behavioral function and is commonly associated with deficits in learned skilled movements (i.e., apraxia). Specifically, patients with Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of degenerative dementia, frequently have problems with manipulating and using tools, such as using a fork to eat a meal. With disease progression, these patients can have difficulty with oral intake, including problems with swallowing.

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