Severe Drooling and Treatment With Botulinum Toxin Severe drooling is associated with discomfort and psychosocial problems and may constitute a health risk. A variety of different surgical and non-surgical treatments have been used to diminish drooling, some of them with little or uncertain effect and others more effective but irreversible or with side effects. Based on clinical ... Article
Article  |   March 2012
Severe Drooling and Treatment With Botulinum Toxin
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Merete Bakke
    School of Dentistry, Department of Oral Medicine, Clinical Oral Physiology, Oral Pathology & Anatomy, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of CopenhagenCopenhagen N, Denmark
  • Allan Bardow
    School of Dentistry, Department of Oral Medicine, Clinical Oral Physiology, Oral Pathology & Anatomy, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of CopenhagenCopenhagen N, Denmark
  • Eigild Møller
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Departments of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Copenhagen University HospitalCopenhagen NV, Denmark
  • © 2012 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders
Article   |   March 2012
Severe Drooling and Treatment With Botulinum Toxin
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), March 2012, Vol. 21, 15-21. doi:10.1044/sasd21.1.15
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), March 2012, Vol. 21, 15-21. doi:10.1044/sasd21.1.15

Severe drooling is associated with discomfort and psychosocial problems and may constitute a health risk. A variety of different surgical and non-surgical treatments have been used to diminish drooling, some of them with little or uncertain effect and others more effective but irreversible or with side effects. Based on clinical evidence, injection with botulinum toxin (BTX) into the parotid and submandibular glands is a useful treatment option, because it is local, reversible, and with few side effects, although it has to be repeated. The mechanism of BTX is a local inhibition of acetylcholine release, which diminishes receptor-coupled secretion and results in a flow rate reduction of 25–50% for 2–7 months.

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