Blast Injury and Dysphagia The views reflected in this publication are those of the authors and do not reflect the official policy of the Department of Army, Department of Defense, and U.S. Government. The United States has been involved in military conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq for more than five years. Medical and ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2007
Blast Injury and Dysphagia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lisa A. Newman
    Army Audiology and Speech Center, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC
  • Amanda I. Gillespie
    Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC
  • Matthew Brigger
    Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA
  • Lisa A. Newman is a research speech-language pathologist and chief of the Speech Pathology Section of the Army Audiology and Speech Center, Walter Reed Army Medical Center. She received her undergraduate and graduate education at Northwestern University, a doctor of science at Boston University, and completed a post-doctoral fellowship in swallowing at Northwestern University. Dr. Newman has many years of clinical experience, especially with swallowing disorders. She has published numerous peer-reviewed articles and chapters in swallowing and swallowing disorders and has spoken nationally and internationally. Her areas of interest are swallowing following blast injuries and head and neck cancer, and swallowing function in infancy.
    Lisa A. Newman is a research speech-language pathologist and chief of the Speech Pathology Section of the Army Audiology and Speech Center, Walter Reed Army Medical Center. She received her undergraduate and graduate education at Northwestern University, a doctor of science at Boston University, and completed a post-doctoral fellowship in swallowing at Northwestern University. Dr. Newman has many years of clinical experience, especially with swallowing disorders. She has published numerous peer-reviewed articles and chapters in swallowing and swallowing disorders and has spoken nationally and internationally. Her areas of interest are swallowing following blast injuries and head and neck cancer, and swallowing function in infancy.×
  • Amanda I. Gillespie is a speech-language pathologist at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. She received an undergraduate degree in speech-language pathology and audiology from New York University and a graduate degree in speech-language pathology from the University of Pittsburgh. Her research and clinical interests include voice and swallowing disorders in adults, including those with head and neck cancer.
    Amanda I. Gillespie is a speech-language pathologist at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. She received an undergraduate degree in speech-language pathology and audiology from New York University and a graduate degree in speech-language pathology from the University of Pittsburgh. Her research and clinical interests include voice and swallowing disorders in adults, including those with head and neck cancer.×
  • LCDR Matthew Brigger is currently a clinical fellow in Pediatric Otolaryngology at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary in Boston. His undergraduate degree in Mechanical Engineering is from Vanderbilt University, and he graduated from the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. He completed his residency in Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery as a naval officer at both the National Naval Medical Center and Walter Reed Army Medical Center. Current research interests include airway reconstuction, the application of angiolytic lasers in the pediatric larynx and multidisciplinary approaches to the management of aerodigestive disorders in children.
    LCDR Matthew Brigger is currently a clinical fellow in Pediatric Otolaryngology at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary in Boston. His undergraduate degree in Mechanical Engineering is from Vanderbilt University, and he graduated from the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. He completed his residency in Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery as a naval officer at both the National Naval Medical Center and Walter Reed Army Medical Center. Current research interests include airway reconstuction, the application of angiolytic lasers in the pediatric larynx and multidisciplinary approaches to the management of aerodigestive disorders in children.×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2007
Blast Injury and Dysphagia
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 2007, Vol. 16, 7-11. doi:10.1044/sasd16.3.7
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 2007, Vol. 16, 7-11. doi:10.1044/sasd16.3.7
The views reflected in this publication are those of the authors and do not reflect the official policy of the Department of Army, Department of Defense, and U.S. Government.
The United States has been involved in military conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq for more than five years. Medical and technological advances have greatly improved the survival rate of those wounded. The use of explosive devices (blasts) has been increasing, resulting in multiple fatalities and injuries. As the wounded recover and return to their civilian communities, speech-language pathologists will be treating blast injury victims, many of whom will also have swallowing deficits. It is, therefore, imperative to understand the nature of blast injuries and the resultant effects on the swallowing mechanism. This article will discuss explosive devices, blast injuries, and swallowing disorders that may result from a blast. Two case studies are presented to illustrate the complexities in diagnosing and managing dysphagia in the patient with blast injury.
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