Treatment and Management of Dysphagia in Thermal Burn and Inhalation Injury Dysphagia is a significant sequela of severe burn injury and is implicated in the poorer functional outcome of burn patients. To date, literature investigating the prevalence and characteristics of dysph-agia from these types of injury is sparse. The speech-language pathologist (SLP), however, is positioned to play an important role in ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2007
Treatment and Management of Dysphagia in Thermal Burn and Inhalation Injury
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Giselle D. Carnaby-Mann
    College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
  • Nicola Clayton
    Speech Pathology Department, Concord Hospital, NSW Australia
  • Cynthia Dubose
    Shands Hospital at the University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
  • She may be contacted at GMann@phhp.ufl.edu.
  • Giselle Carnaby-Mann is a research associate scientist in the Department of Behavioral Science and Community Health, College of Public Health and Health Professions at the University of Florida. She has over 20 years of clinical experience as a speech-language pathologist. Dr. Carnaby-Mann’s research focus lies in the assessment and rehabilitation of swallowing disorders following stroke head/neck cancer and other disorders. In addition, she specializes and teaches in research epidemiology and biostatistics.
    Giselle Carnaby-Mann is a research associate scientist in the Department of Behavioral Science and Community Health, College of Public Health and Health Professions at the University of Florida. She has over 20 years of clinical experience as a speech-language pathologist. Dr. Carnaby-Mann’s research focus lies in the assessment and rehabilitation of swallowing disorders following stroke head/neck cancer and other disorders. In addition, she specializes and teaches in research epidemiology and biostatistics.×
  • Cynthia McKinnon Dubose is an administrative coordinator for Shands Hospital at the University of Florida. She has been a practicing speech-language pathologist for over 10 years. Her research interest focuses on the evaluation and management of dysph-agia following burn injury. She has published and presented internationally on this topic. She was the recipient of the Dysphagia Research Society New Investigator Award in 2003 for her work in thermal burn injury.
    Cynthia McKinnon Dubose is an administrative coordinator for Shands Hospital at the University of Florida. She has been a practicing speech-language pathologist for over 10 years. Her research interest focuses on the evaluation and management of dysph-agia following burn injury. She has published and presented internationally on this topic. She was the recipient of the Dysphagia Research Society New Investigator Award in 2003 for her work in thermal burn injury.×
  • Nicola Clayton is senior clinical speech-language pathologist and specialist consultant to the Multidis-ciplinary Burns team at the Concord Repatriation General Hospital, Sydney, Australia. She has been a practicing speech-language pathologist for over 10 years. She is the Concord Hospital Allied Health representative for the NSW SBIS Burn Prevention Committee, coordinator of the NSW Dysphagia Interest Group, and is a member of the Australian and New Zealand Burns Association. She has published and presented internationally on this topic.
    Nicola Clayton is senior clinical speech-language pathologist and specialist consultant to the Multidis-ciplinary Burns team at the Concord Repatriation General Hospital, Sydney, Australia. She has been a practicing speech-language pathologist for over 10 years. She is the Concord Hospital Allied Health representative for the NSW SBIS Burn Prevention Committee, coordinator of the NSW Dysphagia Interest Group, and is a member of the Australian and New Zealand Burns Association. She has published and presented internationally on this topic.×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2007
Treatment and Management of Dysphagia in Thermal Burn and Inhalation Injury
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 2007, Vol. 16, 2-6. doi:10.1044/sasd16.3.2
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 2007, Vol. 16, 2-6. doi:10.1044/sasd16.3.2
Dysphagia is a significant sequela of severe burn injury and is implicated in the poorer functional outcome of burn patients. To date, literature investigating the prevalence and characteristics of dysph-agia from these types of injury is sparse. The speech-language pathologist (SLP), however, is positioned to play an important role in the management of the burn patient and can contribute significantly to a specialized burn care team.
Burns are the third leading cause of accidental death in the United States (U.S.). It is currently estimated that over 500,000 burn injuries are treated and 4,000 burn deaths occur per year in the US (American Burn Association [ABA], 2007). The spectrum of injury and disability following burn and inhalation injury is broad, and these injuries can result in significant physical and psychosocial impairments. Treatment of such injuries requires highly specialized care that can be provided in hospitals with designated burn units. The ABA 2007 “Burn Incidence and Treatment Fact Sheet” reports that hospitalizations for burn injury total approximately 40,000 per year. Sixty percent of these are admitted to one of the 125 hospitals with specialized burn centers within the U.S. Based on ABA data from 1995–2005, the most common cause of burn injury is fire/flame (46%) and scald (32%). Other causes include hot object contact (8%), electrical (4%), and chemical (3%) burns. Thirty-eight percent of admissions exceed 10% total body service area (TBSA) and 10% exceed 30% TBSA.
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