Feeding the Infant Born With Cleft Lip/Palate: A Literature Review Feeding children born with a craniofacial cleft presents significant challenges to parents and caregivers. These challenges have led to significant numbers of investigations about feeding instruction, special bottles and nipples, breastfeeding, and the use of palatal feeding plates. In this article, I will examine the literature to identify information that ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2007
Feeding the Infant Born With Cleft Lip/Palate: A Literature Review
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John E. Riski
    Children's Healthcare of Atlanta at Scottish Rite, Atlanta, GA
  • John Riski is the clinical director and director of the Speech Pathology Laboratory at the Center for Craniofa-cial Disorders, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Scottish Rite. He has published over 70 professional articles and book chapters on the subjects of cleft palate and related craniofacial disorders, neurologic and structural speech deficits and dysphagia. He is the past-president of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association and the North Carolina Speech, Hearing, and Language Association. He is an ASHA Fellow, past-Coordinator of Division 5 (Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders) and has served as section editor for Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal and the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology.
    John Riski is the clinical director and director of the Speech Pathology Laboratory at the Center for Craniofa-cial Disorders, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Scottish Rite. He has published over 70 professional articles and book chapters on the subjects of cleft palate and related craniofacial disorders, neurologic and structural speech deficits and dysphagia. He is the past-president of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association and the North Carolina Speech, Hearing, and Language Association. He is an ASHA Fellow, past-Coordinator of Division 5 (Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders) and has served as section editor for Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal and the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology.×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2007
Feeding the Infant Born With Cleft Lip/Palate: A Literature Review
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 2007, Vol. 16, 12-17. doi:10.1044/sasd16.3.12
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 2007, Vol. 16, 12-17. doi:10.1044/sasd16.3.12
Feeding children born with a craniofacial cleft presents significant challenges to parents and caregivers. These challenges have led to significant numbers of investigations about feeding instruction, special bottles and nipples, breastfeeding, and the use of palatal feeding plates. In this article, I will examine the literature to identify information that can help guide clinical practice.
Despite the understood need for feeding treatment in children born with cleft lip/palate, the literature suggests that healthcare providers are doing an inadequate job in meeting those needs. Trenouth and Campbell (1996)  questioned the mothers of 25 neonates about the quantity of food taken and the amount of time required to feed their infant. After 2 months, over 25% were still having problems with the quantity of food, and a third had not established a regular feeding pattern. Over 50% had to change feeding method from the method they used initially. Twelve of 25 mothers attempted breast feeding, but none was successful. Almost all mothers were dissatisfied with the information they received while in the hospital and with the backup information and assistance they received after discharge.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia) content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.