Use of Blue Dye and Glucose Oxidase Reagent Strips for Detection of Pulmonary Aspiration: Efficacy & Safety Update The efficacy of using of blue dye and glucose oxidase reagent strips to detect pulmonary aspiration of enteral feedings has been called into question. Recent safety issues have also been raised about using blue dye in critically ill patients. Because of these concerns, many speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are faced ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2005
Use of Blue Dye and Glucose Oxidase Reagent Strips for Detection of Pulmonary Aspiration: Efficacy & Safety Update
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan Brady
    Marianjoy Rehabilitation Hospital, Wheaton, IL
  • Susan Brady is the research coordinator for the Rose McSweeney Voice and Swallowing Center at Marianjoy Rehabilitation Hospital, Wheaton, IL (sbrady@marianjoy.org). The Dr. Ralph and Marian Falk Medical Research Trust provides support for her research activities.
    Susan Brady is the research coordinator for the Rose McSweeney Voice and Swallowing Center at Marianjoy Rehabilitation Hospital, Wheaton, IL (sbrady@marianjoy.org). The Dr. Ralph and Marian Falk Medical Research Trust provides support for her research activities.×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2005
Use of Blue Dye and Glucose Oxidase Reagent Strips for Detection of Pulmonary Aspiration: Efficacy & Safety Update
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), December 2005, Vol. 14, 8-13. doi:10.1044/sasd14.4.8
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), December 2005, Vol. 14, 8-13. doi:10.1044/sasd14.4.8
The efficacy of using of blue dye and glucose oxidase reagent strips to detect pulmonary aspiration of enteral feedings has been called into question. Recent safety issues have also been raised about using blue dye in critically ill patients. Because of these concerns, many speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are faced with the challenge of whether or not to use blue dye for trial feedings with patients with a tracheotomy or during the fiberoptic endoscopic examination of the swallow (FEES). This article will review recent literature on the use of blue dye and oxidase reagent strips to detect pulmonary aspiration.
There are different types of blue dye used in a variety of medical procedures as a clinical marker to detect abnormalities, such as tumors, cellular membrane permeability, blood flow, and pulmonary aspiration. Forms of blue dye that have been used in medical procedures include the Evans blue dye, Methylene blue dye, Isosulfan blue dye, FD & C Blue No. 1, and FD & C Blue No. 2. According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA, 1993), FD & C Blue No. 1 is the most common type of blue dye used to dye enteral feedings in order to detect for pulmonary aspiration.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia) content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.