Food for Thought Does What the Patient Thinks Really Matter? Viewpoint
Viewpoint  |   December 01, 2005
Food for Thought
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rosemary Martino
    University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario
  • Rosemary Martino is an assistant professor in the Graduate Department of Speech-Language Pathology at the University of Toronto. Her research and teaching focuses on swallowing impairment and its impact on patients.
    Rosemary Martino is an assistant professor in the Graduate Department of Speech-Language Pathology at the University of Toronto. Her research and teaching focuses on swallowing impairment and its impact on patients.×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Food for Thought
Viewpoint   |   December 01, 2005
Food for Thought
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), December 2005, Vol. 14, 24-26. doi:10.1044/sasd14.4.24
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), December 2005, Vol. 14, 24-26. doi:10.1044/sasd14.4.24
Most of us received our clinical training according to the biomedical model. That is, we have been taught to think of the physical body as separate and distinct from the psyche. Hence, we believe that targeting the patient’s specific physical dysfunction is enough to successfully treat a physical impairment. Let’s take the example of a patient with acute stroke who is aspirating during the swallow. We would all agree that a likely successful compensatory strategy would be to first trial a chin tuck posture along with, depending on the cognitive capacity of the patient, a supraglottic swallow. These strategies may even be successful in diverting the bolus away from the airway during our videofluoroscopic testing.
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