Tracheostomy and Dysphagia: A Complex Association Tracheotomy is a surgical incision directly into the anterior aspect of the trachea for the purpose of establishing an artificial airway. A tube is placed into the surgically created opening to maintain the airway, resulting in what is typically referred to as a tracheostomy (Bissell, 2000). The tube type ... Article
Article  |   December 2005
Tracheostomy and Dysphagia: A Complex Association
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rita L. Bailey
    Illinois State University, Normal, IL
  • Rita L. Bailey is a speech-language pathologist and Board Recognized Specialist in Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders. She is an assistant professor in the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology at Illinois State University where she teaches coursework in adult and pediatric dysphagia, voice, neuropathology, and evaluation and management of communication and swallowing in tracheostomized and ventilator dependent patients. Her primary research interests include pediatric dysphagia, AAC, and voice.
    Rita L. Bailey is a speech-language pathologist and Board Recognized Specialist in Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders. She is an assistant professor in the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology at Illinois State University where she teaches coursework in adult and pediatric dysphagia, voice, neuropathology, and evaluation and management of communication and swallowing in tracheostomized and ventilator dependent patients. Her primary research interests include pediatric dysphagia, AAC, and voice.×
  • Copyright © 2005 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Articles
Article   |   December 2005
Tracheostomy and Dysphagia: A Complex Association
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), December 2005, Vol. 14, 2-7. doi:10.1044/sasd14.4.2
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), December 2005, Vol. 14, 2-7. doi:10.1044/sasd14.4.2
Tracheotomy is a surgical incision directly into the anterior aspect of the trachea for the purpose of establishing an artificial airway. A tube is placed into the surgically created opening to maintain the airway, resulting in what is typically referred to as a tracheostomy (Bissell, 2000). The tube type and size specifications vary and are determined by medical personnel according to patient factors, including size and medical needs. An artificial airway is often required for respiratory disturbances, such as primary lung disease, systemic disease with secondary lung involvement, neuromuscular disease, central nervous system depression, trauma, diseases complicated by extremes of age, mechanical obstruction, and recurrent aspiration (Bach & Ishikawa, 2000; Fornataro- Clerici & Roop, 1997b).
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