Clinical and Fluoroscopic Issues in the Management of Swallowing Disorders in Infants and Young Children With Tracheostomies An estimated 4,861 tracheotomies are performed yearly on pediatric patients in the United States (Lewis, Carron, Perkins, Sie, & Feudtner, 2003). Over half are performed on children between the ages of birth and 11 months (Carron, Derkay, Strope, Nosonchuk, & Darrow, 2000; Kenna, Reilly, & Stool, 1987; Lewis et ... Article
Article  |   December 2005
Clinical and Fluoroscopic Issues in the Management of Swallowing Disorders in Infants and Young Children With Tracheostomies
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Suzanne S. Abraham
    Department of Otolaryngology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY
  • Suzanne Abraham is an associate professor in the Department of Otolaryngology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. She is a member of the Otolaryngology Faculty Practice and on staff of the Montefiore Medical Center and the Children’s Hospital at Montefiore in the Bronx, NY.
    Suzanne Abraham is an associate professor in the Department of Otolaryngology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. She is a member of the Otolaryngology Faculty Practice and on staff of the Montefiore Medical Center and the Children’s Hospital at Montefiore in the Bronx, NY.×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Articles
Article   |   December 2005
Clinical and Fluoroscopic Issues in the Management of Swallowing Disorders in Infants and Young Children With Tracheostomies
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), December 2005, Vol. 14, 19-24. doi:10.1044/sasd14.4.19
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), December 2005, Vol. 14, 19-24. doi:10.1044/sasd14.4.19
An estimated 4,861 tracheotomies are performed yearly on pediatric patients in the United States (Lewis, Carron, Perkins, Sie, & Feudtner, 2003). Over half are performed on children between the ages of birth and 11 months (Carron, Derkay, Strope, Nosonchuk, & Darrow, 2000; Kenna, Reilly, & Stool, 1987; Lewis et al., 2003; Wetmore, Marsh, Thompson, & Tom, 1999). The majority of the current population of children with tracheostomies are 2 to 3 years of age, although there is a tendency for children cannulated for prolonged ventilation, the primary indicator for tracheostomy today, to be younger with a mean age of 1.4 years (Carron et al.; Hadfield, Lloyd-Faulconbridge, Almeyda, Albert, & Bailey, 2003; Pereira, MacGregor, McDuffie, & Mitchell, 2003; Wetmore et al.). Duration of cannulation tends to be greater than 24 months (Carron et al.; Wetmore et al.). However, children with craniofacial anomalies cannulated for upper airway obstruction and those cannulated secondary to trauma are more likely to be decannulated in less than 24 months, whereas children with neurological impairments and tracheostomies typically remain cannulated for an average of 46 months (Carron et al.).
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