Ethics and Quality of Life: Opposing Ideals? This article centers on two concepts: ethics and quality of life. Ethos, the Greek root of ethics, is defined as “the disposition, character, or fundamental values peculiar to a specific person, people, culture, or movement” (American Heritage Dictionary, 2000). Ethics is “the explicit philosophical reflection on moral beliefs and ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2005
Ethics and Quality of Life: Opposing Ideals?
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Martin B. Brodsky
    Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2005
Ethics and Quality of Life: Opposing Ideals?
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 2005, Vol. 14, 7-12. doi:10.1044/sasd14.3.7
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 2005, Vol. 14, 7-12. doi:10.1044/sasd14.3.7
This article centers on two concepts: ethics and quality of life. Ethos, the Greek root of ethics, is defined as “the disposition, character, or fundamental values peculiar to a specific person, people, culture, or movement” (American Heritage Dictionary, 2000). Ethics is “the explicit philosophical reflection on moral beliefs and practices...a conscious stepping back and reflecting on morality” (Hinman, 2002). Quality of life can be defined as an individual’s consciously perceived positive and negative, cognitive, and affective experience (Næss, 1999; Næss, Mastekaasa, Moum, & Sørensen, 1987; Sorensen & Næss, 1996). Though very different in their definitions, ethics and quality of life both regard the person or people involved, circumstances surrounding the person or people, and time. Ethics and quality of life guide our profession. Clinical recommendations, therefore, are derived from the reciprocal relationship between our professional ethics (i.e., rules and standards of conduct) and what we want as the best quality of life for our patients (i.e., clinician perception), sometimes opposing each other in patient care.
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