International Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Swallowing Editor–s Note: The newsletter committee invited three international speech-language pathologists to describe the historical and current involvement of speech-language pathologists in dysphagia assessment and intervention in their countries. The intent of this article is to explore variations in the roles played by speech-language pathologists, whether as a single profession ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2004
International Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Swallowing
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paula Leslie
    University of Newcastle Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom
  • Ingrid Scholten
    Flinders University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia
  • Soenke Stanschus
    Abteilung Logopaedie Klinikum Karlsbad-Langensteinback, Karlsbad, Germany
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2004
International Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Swallowing
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), June 2004, Vol. 13, 7-18. doi:10.1044/sasd13.2.7
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), June 2004, Vol. 13, 7-18. doi:10.1044/sasd13.2.7
Editor–s Note: The newsletter committee invited three international speech-language pathologists to describe the historical and current involvement of speech-language pathologists in dysphagia assessment and intervention in their countries. The intent of this article is to explore variations in the roles played by speech-language pathologists, whether as a single profession or as part of a team, and to consider differences in the evolution of professional roles and scope of practice.
Dysphagia management in the United Kingdom is a multidisciplinary activity. This sounds ideal, but there are two great camps: oropharyngeal and gastroesophageal. We have many disciplines involved, but from two very different perspectives. Occasionally, these two paths cross, and we have a unified interdisciplinary approach, where the clinicians do not consider the upper esophageal sphincter to be the border of professional interest and the continuous nature of the oropharyngeal esophageal tract is respected. I raise this issue because dysphagia management discussion among speech-language pathologists (speech and language therapists in the United Kingdom) often omits the long history of involvement by gastroenterologists and allied clinicians, albeit usually in that foreign land below the cricopharyngeus. In the UK section, the term dysphagia refers primarily to oropharyngeal dysphagia.
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