Dysphagia Involvement by Speech-Language Pathologists Speech-language pathologists became involved in swallowing and swallowing disorders in the 1920s and 1930s as they worked with children with cerebral palsy and other neuromotor disorders. Speech-language pathologists focused largely on oromotor control and on the feeding process. At that time, speech-language pathology was not involved in medical settings ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2004
Dysphagia Involvement by Speech-Language Pathologists
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeri A. Logemann
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2004
Dysphagia Involvement by Speech-Language Pathologists
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), June 2004, Vol. 13, 4-6. doi:10.1044/sasd13.2.4
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), June 2004, Vol. 13, 4-6. doi:10.1044/sasd13.2.4
Speech-language pathologists became involved in swallowing and swallowing disorders in the 1920s and 1930s as they worked with children with cerebral palsy and other neuromotor disorders. Speech-language pathologists focused largely on oromotor control and on the feeding process. At that time, speech-language pathology was not involved in medical settings in any large measure. Work with individuals in hospital settings began at some Veterans Hospitals and with a few clinicians who were working as private practitioners/consultants in hospitals around the country. Then, in the late 1960s and 1970s, the profession expanded in numbers and in work settings to include more medical clinics with outpatients and hospitals with in-patients as well as rehabilitation settings. Since there is a high incidence of swallow disorders in patients with neurologic damage, clinicians working with those populations were often asked to treat the dysphagia as well as the speech and language problem. “Since you know about the mouth, pharynx, and larynx, can’t you help this patient with his swallowing as well as his speech?” was a question frequently asked of many of us. Since prospective payment systems were not in place at that time, patients were often kept in the hospital for months because of their swallowing problem.
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