The Choice for Specialty Recognition in Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders In this era of evidence-based practice, clinical outcomes have become the gold standard for assessing quality of care. Specialty board certification in medicine and other health care professions is often used as a standard of excellence and a marker of high-quality care. Thus, board certification or specialty recognition is ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2004
The Choice for Specialty Recognition in Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paula A. Sullivan
    William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital and Division of Otolaryngology and Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2004
The Choice for Specialty Recognition in Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), June 2004, Vol. 13, 22-25. doi:10.1044/sasd13.2.22
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), June 2004, Vol. 13, 22-25. doi:10.1044/sasd13.2.22
In this era of evidence-based practice, clinical outcomes have become the gold standard for assessing quality of care. Specialty board certification in medicine and other health care professions is often used as a standard of excellence and a marker of high-quality care. Thus, board certification or specialty recognition is considered to be a method of ensuring the quality of a practitioner’s clinical care. Because of its perceived value by the American public, health care providers, health care payers, and employers, board certification or specialty recognition is evolving into a virtual expectation for medical practitioners in the United States. With the recent establishment of the Specialty Recognition Board in Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (SBS), speech-language pathologists specializing in dysphagia now have a means to obtain specialty recognition. This article will examine trends in board certification or specialty recognition in health care and the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology and discuss the implications of these trends for dysphagia practitioners considering specialty recognition.
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