Oral Sensation: Genetic and Pathological Sources of Variation We do not all live in the same oral sensory worlds. There exists broad individual variation in oral sensation, some of which is genetic and some of which arises from pathology. Understanding this variation may reveal important contributions of oral sensation to swallowing. True taste consists of ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2003
Oral Sensation: Genetic and Pathological Sources of Variation
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Linda M. Bartoshuk
    Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
  • Valerie B. Duffy
    University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT
  • Steven B. Leder
    Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
  • Derek J. Snyder
    Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
  • Linda Bartoshuk is professor in the Department of Surgery (Otolaryngol-ogy) at the Yale University School of Medicine (linda.bartoshuk@yale.edu). Valerie Duffy is associate professor of dietetics in the School of Allied Health at the University of Connecticut (valerie.duffy@yale.edu). Steven Leder is director of the Communications Disorders Center and professor in the Department of Surgery (Otolaryngology) at the Yale University School of Medicine (steven.leder@yale.edu). Derek Snyder is a doctoral student in neuroscience at Yale University (derek. snyder@yale.edu).
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2003
Oral Sensation: Genetic and Pathological Sources of Variation
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), December 2003, Vol. 12, 3-9. doi:10.1044/sasd12.4.3
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), December 2003, Vol. 12, 3-9. doi:10.1044/sasd12.4.3
We do not all live in the same oral sensory worlds. There exists broad individual variation in oral sensation, some of which is genetic and some of which arises from pathology. Understanding this variation may reveal important contributions of oral sensation to swallowing.
True taste consists of salt, sweet, sour, and bitter sensations. Taste sensations arise from taste buds, specialized cells with mi-crovilli that house receptor sites that interact with stimulus molecules. Tastants gain access to the receptor sites by flowing into the taste pore (thus, they must be dissolved in water or saliva), a space above the taste bud that is continuous with the surface of the tongue.
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