Report on Dysphagia Society Meeting The 12th annual meeting of the Dysphagia Research Society (DRS) took place in San Francisco, October 2–4, 2003. The conference program featured panel discussions on various topics, including the evidence for a link between gastro-esophageal reflux and laryngitis. Colin Howden from Northwestern University began the discussion by laying out ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2003
Report on Dysphagia Society Meeting
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Catriona M. Steele
    Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
  • Catriona Steele is a research scientist at Toronto Rehabilitation Institute (catriona.steele@utoronto.ca).
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2003
Report on Dysphagia Society Meeting
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), December 2003, Vol. 12, 32-34. doi:10.1044/sasd12.4.32
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), December 2003, Vol. 12, 32-34. doi:10.1044/sasd12.4.32
The 12th annual meeting of the Dysphagia Research Society (DRS) took place in San Francisco, October 2–4, 2003. The conference program featured panel discussions on various topics, including the evidence for a link between gastro-esophageal reflux and laryngitis. Colin Howden from Northwestern University began the discussion by laying out criteria for levels of evidence, originally proposed by Sackett and colleagues (Sackett, Rosenberg, Muir Gray, Haynes, & Richardson, 1996). These criteria were then applied to the issue of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) by a panel comprised of gastroenter-ologists, otolaryngologists, and speech-language pathologists. The presentations made it clear that inconsistencies arise when comparing the different types of evidence about LPR, such as pH-manometry of the esophagus and hypopharynx, radiographic evidence of retrograde flow in the esophagus, histological studies of laryngeal mucosa, response to surgical intervention, and the results of drug trials including placebo effects. Reza Shaker proposed that a multidisciplinary organization like DRS is uniquely positioned to explore apparent contradictions from different studies, and to pull the evidence together to form an evidence-based consensus position on the appropriate definition, diagnosis and management of this disorder.
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