Food Choices and Food Intake in the Elderly Not eating enough to meet energy needs can be a problem among the elderly. This age-associated anorexia may damage organ functioning and increase the risk of nutrition-related illness. Sudden unexplained weight loss often precedes hospitalization and is associated with poor prognosis and higher mortality risk in a hospital setting ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2003
Food Choices and Food Intake in the Elderly
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Barbara J. Rolls
    The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
  • Adam Drewnowski
    University of Washington, Seattle, WA
  • Barbara Rolls is professor of nutrition and Guthrie Chair in Nutrition at Penn State University (bjr4@psu. edu). Adam Drewnowski is professor of epidemiology in the School of Public Health and Community Medicine; adjunct professor of medicine in the Medical School and is the director of the Center for Public Health Nutrition at the University of Washington.
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2003
Food Choices and Food Intake in the Elderly
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), December 2003, Vol. 12, 27-32. doi:10.1044/sasd12.4.27
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), December 2003, Vol. 12, 27-32. doi:10.1044/sasd12.4.27
Not eating enough to meet energy needs can be a problem among the elderly. This age-associated anorexia may damage organ functioning and increase the risk of nutrition-related illness. Sudden unexplained weight loss often precedes hospitalization and is associated with poor prognosis and higher mortality risk in a hospital setting (Seidell & Visscher, 2000). Among potential causes for reduced energy intakes in aging are a sharp reduction in physical activity and a decline in basal metabolic rate (Morley, 2001). The accumulated burden of chronic disease may be another contributing factor. Physical factors, including poor dentition or ill-fitting dentures, difficulty with swallowing, immobility, or inability to feed oneself may restrict food choices and make food consumption more difficult (Morley, 2002; Rolls & Drewnowski, 1996; Seidell & Visscher, 2000).
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