Implications of Pediatric Esophageal Disorders for the Speech-Language Pathologist Infants and children with gastrointestinal (GI) problems of the esophagus often present initially with feeding and swallowing problems. In other instances, GI problems may exacerbate preexisting feeding and swallowing problems. GI disorders that affect, or are affected by, esophageal function may include structural abnormalities of the esophagus and stomach, ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2003
Implications of Pediatric Esophageal Disorders for the Speech-Language Pathologist
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joan C. Arvedson
    Children's Hospital of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI
  • Joan Arvedson is program coordinator of Feeding and Swallowing Services at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and clinical professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the Medical College of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Her email address is jarvedson@chw.org.
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2003
Implications of Pediatric Esophageal Disorders for the Speech-Language Pathologist
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), June 2003, Vol. 12, 17-21. doi:10.1044/sasd12.2.17
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), June 2003, Vol. 12, 17-21. doi:10.1044/sasd12.2.17
Infants and children with gastrointestinal (GI) problems of the esophagus often present initially with feeding and swallowing problems. In other instances, GI problems may exacerbate preexisting feeding and swallowing problems. GI disorders that affect, or are affected by, esophageal function may include structural abnormalities of the esophagus and stomach, dysmotility disorders, inflammatory diseases, and foreign body ingestion. In some instances, it is the astute speech-language pathologist who determines a need for additional GI workup following a clinical and instrumental examination of feeding and swallowing. When a speech-language pathologist initially evaluates a child who already has a diagnosis of GI problems, he/she should understand the etiology and implications of the diagnosis in order to carry out an effective examination. Findings of oral sensorimotor and swallowing function, in light of other postural, respiratory, neurodevelopmental, and gastrointestinal function, will assist the clinician to make optimal management recommendations. Such recommendations are usually made best in the context of a team approach.
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