An Example of a Graduate-Level Course in Pediatric Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders For several years, I have taught the graduate-level course in pediatric swallowing and swallowing disorders at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK). One of many reasons why I accepted a position at UTK was that the Department of Speech-Language Pathology was planning to offer a full semester (approximately 16 ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2002
An Example of a Graduate-Level Course in Pediatric Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jacki L. Ruark
    University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2002
An Example of a Graduate-Level Course in Pediatric Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 2002, Vol. 11, 19-23. doi:10.1044/sasd11.3.19
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 2002, Vol. 11, 19-23. doi:10.1044/sasd11.3.19
For several years, I have taught the graduate-level course in pediatric swallowing and swallowing disorders at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK). One of many reasons why I accepted a position at UTK was that the Department of Speech-Language Pathology was planning to offer a full semester (approximately 16 weeks) graduate-level course in pediatric oromotor disorders (topics were to include developmental motor speech, feeding, and swallowing disorders). Initially, I organized the course into two sections: one-half of the course content (approximately 8 weeks) addressed developmental motor speech disorders and the other half focused on the development of feeding and swallowing skills and pediatric dysphagia. However, as time went on, I found it increasingly difficult to address all topics thoroughly and began to devote the entire semester to covering pediatric swallowing and swallowing disorders. The graduate students enrolled in speech pathology at UTK also attended a separate graduatelevel course in adult swallowing and swallowing disorders. The adult swallowing class was required; the pediatric course was not. Students benefited from taking the adult swallowing course prior to the pediatric course because the adult course provided them with core information in regard to the swallowing process and introduced them to various components of swallowing disorders and treatment. There are several reasons why graduate programs in speech-language pathology should consider offering a course specific to pediat-ric dysphagia:
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