Reply From the Coordinator The input of Drs. Crary and Miller is greatly appreciated. I strongly agree that the division newsletter should serve as a forum for the open and fair exchange of ideas and perspectives on important issues confronting us in dys-phagia care delivery in order to develop effective solutions and strategies. ... Coordinator’s Column
Coordinator’s Column  |   June 01, 2002
Reply From the Coordinator
Author Notes
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Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Coordinator's Column
Coordinator’s Column   |   June 01, 2002
Reply From the Coordinator
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), June 2002, Vol. 11, 30. doi:10.1044/sasd11.2.30
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), June 2002, Vol. 11, 30. doi:10.1044/sasd11.2.30
The input of Drs. Crary and Miller is greatly appreciated. I strongly agree that the division newsletter should serve as a forum for the open and fair exchange of ideas and perspectives on important issues confronting us in dys-phagia care delivery in order to develop effective solutions and strategies.
I applaud the authors’ futuristic thinking relative to the formation of a multidisciplinary task force. However, my concern is that their overall perception of the current trend in dysphagia care delivery is more idealistic than realistic. Personally, I do not believe that what is occurring in the field is a true collaborative sharing of knowledge, skills, and expertise in order to mutually benefit from each others perspective and, thus, to mutually enhance our services to dysphagia patients. (See “Specialized Knowledge and Skills in Eating and Feeding for Occupational Therapy Practice,” in the American Journal of Occupational Therapy’s November-December 2000 issue, Vol. 54, No. 6, pages 629–640.) Speech-language pathologists are being asked to “train” professionals from other disciplines to provide dysphagia services because of financial, not altruistic reasons. I am sure our colleagues in skilled nursing facilities will tell us that the current health care market does not allow for “dys-phagia teams.” Rather, dysphagia services are being delegated to the health care professional whose services can be provided at the least cost. In addition, the use of professional educational materials or courses by other disciplines developed for and by speech-language pathologists as the primary or only method of knowledge and skill acquisition is concerning given our different theoretic and scientific bases. In his testimony at the recent American Medical Association RUC meeting, a neurologist told the audience that he felt a well-trained OT could provide good dysphagia care for his patients. However, he added that a speech-language pathologist was his preferred provider, given the professional’s additional expertise and skill in identifying and managing concomitant speech, language, and cognitive deficits which are critical for his differential diagnosis.
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