The Modified Barium Study Radiographic examination of the pharynx is typically referred to as a modified barium swallow study (MBS), dynamic swallowing study, cookie swallow, or rehab swallow study, and is accomplished by three methods: cineradiography, video-fluoroscopy, or video-radiography and rapid sequence digital radiography (Leonard & Kendall, 1997). Wilhelm Roentgen in Germany observed ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 1999
The Modified Barium Study
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Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / State of the Science
Article   |   April 01, 1999
The Modified Barium Study
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), April 1999, Vol. 8, 3-5. doi:10.1044/sasd8.1.3
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), April 1999, Vol. 8, 3-5. doi:10.1044/sasd8.1.3
Radiographic examination of the pharynx is typically referred to as a modified barium swallow study (MBS), dynamic swallowing study, cookie swallow, or rehab swallow study, and is accomplished by three methods: cineradiography, video-fluoroscopy, or video-radiography and rapid sequence digital radiography (Leonard & Kendall, 1997).
Wilhelm Roentgen in Germany observed the first dynamic radiographic image in 1895. Despite (Murray, 1999) early efforts, it was not until the early 1930s that the development of fluoroscopy permitted examination of the movement patterns of the oral cavity, pharynx, and esophagus during swallowing. The fluoroscopic image first recorded on film was called cinefluorography, which was a recording of the amplified fluoroscopic image on film in rapid sequence. This allowed examination of the movement patterns of the bolus and structures in slow motion and frame by frame. The movie film was exposed at various speeds up to 60 frames per second (Logemann, 1998). The major advantage of this system was the high spatial resolution of the images and the ability to analyze individual frames easily. The major disadvantage was greater radiation exposure than other methods, as well as difficulties related to processing and analysis of the film, which prevented immediate review of the study. Cineradiography has been replaced by videofluorography in most facilities, which is a recording of the fluoroscopic image by a television monitor and magnetic tape. Videofluorography appeared adequate for studies, although the spatial resolution is less than with cineradiography. Videofluorgraphy or videofluoroscopy has the advantages of less radiation exposure, easier manipulation of the images, and the ability to record sound with immediate playback (Leonard & Kendall, 1997).
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