Clinical Issues The “art” and science in the diagnosis and treatment of persons with swallowing disorders is being able to sit back and look at the big picture. It’s often too easy to assume the outcome of a radiographic swallowing test based on medical diagnosis alone—again assuming that the diagnosis provided ... Clinical Issues
Clinical Issues  |   April 01, 1999
Clinical Issues
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Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Clinical Issues
Clinical Issues   |   April 01, 1999
Clinical Issues
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), April 1999, Vol. 8, 11-12. doi:10.1044/sasd8.1.11
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), April 1999, Vol. 8, 11-12. doi:10.1044/sasd8.1.11
The “art” and science in the diagnosis and treatment of persons with swallowing disorders is being able to sit back and look at the big picture.
It’s often too easy to assume the outcome of a radiographic swallowing test based on medical diagnosis alone—again assuming that the diagnosis provided to us is correct. A former patient of mine with Parkinson’s disease was referred for a radiographic swallow study. Knowing the clinical features of the disease process and subsequent changes in the oral and pharyngeal phases of swallowing, I set off for the swallow study confident of what to anticipate and had already in my mind outlined a treatment plan.
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