Facial Neuromuscular Retraining Facial nerve paresis can result from conditions like Bell’s palsy, herpes zoster, tumors, facial trauma, otitis media, post-surgical trauma, and congenital disorders. Facial nerve dysfunction can lead to problems with physical function, such as excessive tearing of the affected eye, drooling, and difficulties with speech, eating, and drinking. As ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2005
Facial Neuromuscular Retraining
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joanne Dorion
    Ambulatory Rehabilitation Services, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Science Center, Toronto, Canada
  • Joanne Dorion is a physical therapist working in the Ambulatory Rehabilitation Service of Sunnybrook and Women’s College Health Science Centre, Toronto, Canada. She is a lecturer at the University of Toronto, School of Physical Therapy. She also sees clients at Glendon Sports Medicine Clinic, York University, Toronto.
    Joanne Dorion is a physical therapist working in the Ambulatory Rehabilitation Service of Sunnybrook and Women’s College Health Science Centre, Toronto, Canada. She is a lecturer at the University of Toronto, School of Physical Therapy. She also sees clients at Glendon Sports Medicine Clinic, York University, Toronto.×
  • Ms. Dorion may be reached at Joanne.Dorion@sw.ca.
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2005
Facial Neuromuscular Retraining
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), June 2005, Vol. 14, 18-23. doi:10.1044/sasd14.2.18
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), June 2005, Vol. 14, 18-23. doi:10.1044/sasd14.2.18
Facial nerve paresis can result from conditions like Bell’s palsy, herpes zoster, tumors, facial trauma, otitis media, post-surgical trauma, and congenital disorders. Facial nerve dysfunction can lead to problems with physical function, such as excessive tearing of the affected eye, drooling, and difficulties with speech, eating, and drinking. As physical appearance and nonverbal facial expressions can be affected, the psychological effects can be profound (Brach, VanSwear-ingen, Delitto, & Johnson, 1997).
Synkinesis and weakness can be disturbing sequelae of facial nerve paresis. Synkinesis is defined as involuntary muscle contractions accompanying intended movement (Brach, VanSwearingen, Delitto et al., 1997). Examples of synkinesis are involuntary eye closure associated with lip pucker or involuntary cheek muscle contraction with eye closure.
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