Perspectives on Swallowing Disorders and Their Treatment in Parkinson's Disease With Emphasis on the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment As many as 95% of people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) have a swallowing disorder (Eadie & Tyrer, 1965; Hunter, Crameri, Austin, Woodward, & Hughes, 1997). These disorders have been reported to affect all phases of swallowing and are more prevalent in the advanced stages of PD (Ali et al., ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2005
Perspectives on Swallowing Disorders and Their Treatment in Parkinson's Disease With Emphasis on the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Leslie A. Will
    Department of Speech, Language, Hearing Science University of Colorado, Boulder, CO
    National Center for Voice and Speech, Denver Center for the Performing Arts, Denver, CO
  • Lorraine O. Ramig
    Department of Speech, Language, Hearing Science University of Colorado, Boulder, CO
    National Center for Voice and Speech, Denver Center for the Performing Arts, Denver, CO
    Department of Biobehavior, Columbia University, New York, NY
  • Leslie Will, MA, CCC-SLP, MBA, is a speech-language pathologist and research associate at the National Center for Voice and Speech in Denver, CO. She is a member of Dr. Lorraine Ramig’s research team and is a doctoral student at the University of Colorado-Boulder. Prior to joining Dr. Ramig’s team in 2001, she was on the clinical faculty at the University of Colorado-Boulder teaching courses in motor speech, language, and voice disorders and providing clinical supervision. Leslie is actively involved in research investigating voice and speech production as well as treatment in Parkinson disease and stroke.
    Leslie Will, MA, CCC-SLP, MBA, is a speech-language pathologist and research associate at the National Center for Voice and Speech in Denver, CO. She is a member of Dr. Lorraine Ramig’s research team and is a doctoral student at the University of Colorado-Boulder. Prior to joining Dr. Ramig’s team in 2001, she was on the clinical faculty at the University of Colorado-Boulder teaching courses in motor speech, language, and voice disorders and providing clinical supervision. Leslie is actively involved in research investigating voice and speech production as well as treatment in Parkinson disease and stroke.×
  • Ms. Will may be reached at Leslie.Will@colorado.edu.
  • Lorraine Ramig, PhD, CCC-SLP is a professor at the University of Colorado-Boulder, a senior scientist at the National Center for Voice and Speech, and an Adjunct Professor at Columbia University in New York City. She received her PhD from Purdue University, her master’s degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and her bachelor’s degree from the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh.
    Lorraine Ramig, PhD, CCC-SLP is a professor at the University of Colorado-Boulder, a senior scientist at the National Center for Voice and Speech, and an Adjunct Professor at Columbia University in New York City. She received her PhD from Purdue University, her master’s degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and her bachelor’s degree from the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh.×
  • Dr. Ramig may be reached at ramig@spot.colorado.edu.
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2005
Perspectives on Swallowing Disorders and Their Treatment in Parkinson's Disease With Emphasis on the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), June 2005, Vol. 14, 11-17. doi:10.1044/sasd14.2.11
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), June 2005, Vol. 14, 11-17. doi:10.1044/sasd14.2.11
As many as 95% of people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) have a swallowing disorder (Eadie & Tyrer, 1965; Hunter, Crameri, Austin, Woodward, & Hughes, 1997). These disorders have been reported to affect all phases of swallowing and are more prevalent in the advanced stages of PD (Ali et al., 1996; Lieberman, 1980; Monte, da Silva-Junior, Braga-Neto, Nobre e Souza, & Sales de Bruin, 2004; Robbins, Logemann, & Kirshner, 1986). The potential impact of swallowing disorders in PD can include discomfort, difficulty taking oral medications, inability to maintain hydration and nutrition, and a high incidence of bronchopulmonary pneumonia as a cause of death (Bushmann, Dobmeyer, Leeker, & Perlmutter, 1989). Synthetic dopamine is the traditional pharmacological agent for management of PD symptoms; however, the effects of dopamine on improving swallowing have not been clearly demonstrated (Calne, Shaw, & Spiers, 1970; Hunter et al., 1997; Robbins et al., 1986). Traditional behavioral swallowing treatment techniques have focused on postures, maneuvers, and diet modifications to maximize safe and pleasurable oral intake for people with PD. More recently, a preliminary study of the effect of intensive voice treatment, Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT®), has provided evidence for improved swallowing as well as improved functional communication in people with idiopathic PD (Sharkawi et al., 2002).
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