Integration of Breathing and Oropharyngeal Swallowing: A Historical Perspective and 13-Year Research Experience Inspired and expired gases and ingested materials enter and exit through a common tube, the pharynx; therefore, respiration and swallowing must interact (Miller, 1982). Like swallowing, respiration is a basic physiologic process through which the normal cellular metabolic requirements of continuous oxygen supply and continuous disposal of carbon dioxide ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2003
Integration of Breathing and Oropharyngeal Swallowing: A Historical Perspective and 13-Year Research Experience
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Bonnie Martin-Harris
    MUSC Evelyn Trammell Institute for Voice and Swallowing Disorders, Charleston, SC
  • Bonnie Martin-Harris is associate professor in the Departments of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery and College of Health Professions at the Medical University of South Carolina. She is Director of the MUSC Evelyn Trammell Institute for Voice and Swallowing. harrisbm@musc.edu
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2003
Integration of Breathing and Oropharyngeal Swallowing: A Historical Perspective and 13-Year Research Experience
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 2003, Vol. 12, 6-12. doi:10.1044/sasd12.3.6
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 2003, Vol. 12, 6-12. doi:10.1044/sasd12.3.6
Inspired and expired gases and ingested materials enter and exit through a common tube, the pharynx; therefore, respiration and swallowing must interact (Miller, 1982). Like swallowing, respiration is a basic physiologic process through which the normal cellular metabolic requirements of continuous oxygen supply and continuous disposal of carbon dioxide are met. Respiration involves ventilation, the properties of the airways and mechanical processes that transport air to and from the gaseous-exchanging surfaces of the lung, and diffusion, the movement of gas across the air-blood barrier in the alveoli. It is at the more peripheral ventilatory level that the interdependence of respiration and deglutition is most clinically apparent (Martin, 1991).
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