Why Use a Standard Videofluoroscopic Protocol? We first developed the video-fluoroscopic protocol in 1971 to study patients with Parkinson’s disease. My first job after completing my postdoctoral fellowship was studying dysarthria in patients with Parkinson’s disease and other neurologic disorders in the Department of Neurology at Northwestern University Medical School, working with Dr. Benjamin Boshes ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2002
Why Use a Standard Videofluoroscopic Protocol?
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeri A. Logemann
    Evanston, IL
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2002
Why Use a Standard Videofluoroscopic Protocol?
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), March 2002, Vol. 11, 4-6. doi:10.1044/sasd11.1.4
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), March 2002, Vol. 11, 4-6. doi:10.1044/sasd11.1.4
We first developed the video-fluoroscopic protocol in 1971 to study patients with Parkinson’s disease. My first job after completing my postdoctoral fellowship was studying dysarthria in patients with Parkinson’s disease and other neurologic disorders in the Department of Neurology at Northwestern University Medical School, working with Dr. Benjamin Boshes (Blonsky, Logemann, Boshes, & Fisher, 1975; Logemann, Boshes, & Fisher, 1972; Logemann, Fisher, Boshes, & Blonsky, 1978). At that time, L-dopa had just become available and patients were being admitted to the hospital, washed off their normal anti-Parkinson medications, and placed on L-dopa. Patients often exhibited severe symptoms after being cleared of their prior medication. After studying their speech for a year, we realized that swallowing was quite impaired in many of these patients. Knowing that the patients would be significantly impaired off medication, we decided to look at swallowing in as cautious a way as possible and developed a protocol in which we gave patients only 2 swallows each of 1 ml thin liquid, 1–3 ml of pudding and 1/4 of a Lorna Doone cookie coated with barium pudding. We felt that the risk of aspiration would be minimal and thus the risk of any pulmonary problems also minimal if we kept to these small boluses. In fact, that was our experience, and we maintained this protocol for many years (Blonsky et al., 1975).
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