Mastication and Swallowing in Children The goal of this issue of the is to define what we know about swallowing in various normal populations. In contrast to the amount of information available on mastication and swallowing in typical adults, less is known about the maturation of these behaviors in children (e.g., the effect of ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2001
Mastication and Swallowing in Children
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jacki L. Ruark
    University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2001
Mastication and Swallowing in Children
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), March 2001, Vol. 10, 5-7. doi:10.1044/sasd10.1.5
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), March 2001, Vol. 10, 5-7. doi:10.1044/sasd10.1.5
The goal of this issue of the is to define what we know about swallowing in various normal populations. In contrast to the amount of information available on mastication and swallowing in typical adults, less is known about the maturation of these behaviors in children (e.g., the effect of bolus consistency on oropharyngeal muscle activity during swallowing). In the past, methodological limitations, such as difficulty in acquiring physiological data from typically developing children and the complexities of oropharyngeal and laryngeal muscle activity, have impeded our knowledge of feeding and swallowing development. Modern technological advances, however, such as the use of ultrasonography and electromyograpy (EMG), are now providing scientists with tools to carry out developmental physiologic investigations. Although the development of oropharyngeal and laryngeal muscle activity has been extensively described in the literature, these descriptions are often qualitative. Recent endeavors of several scientists, however, have provided us with quantitative data that describe respiratory, oropharyngeal, and laryngeal muscle activity that occurs during feeding and swallowing in young children. Abetter knowledge of the development of these behaviors in typically developing children is necessary, not only to further our understanding of developmental and mature processes, but also to formulate efficacious treatment for pediatric dysphagia. Thus, the goal of this article is to inform the reader about the ventures of several scientists who have supplied us with empirically based information on feeding and swallowing development.
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