Effects of Volume or Viscosity Changes on the Pharyngeal Stage of Deglutition in Normal, Healthy Adults When asked to write a short article on the present state of knowledge relating to volume or viscosity effects on normal adult swallowing, I thought that this would be a rather straight forward task. But it came to pass, that after reviewing in excess of 1,400 titles that came ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2001
Effects of Volume or Viscosity Changes on the Pharyngeal Stage of Deglutition in Normal, Healthy Adults
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Adrienne L. Perlman
    Department of Speech and Hearing Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2001
Effects of Volume or Viscosity Changes on the Pharyngeal Stage of Deglutition in Normal, Healthy Adults
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), March 2001, Vol. 10, 10-13. doi:10.1044/sasd10.1.10
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), March 2001, Vol. 10, 10-13. doi:10.1044/sasd10.1.10
When asked to write a short article on the present state of knowledge relating to volume or viscosity effects on normal adult swallowing, I thought that this would be a rather straight forward task. But it came to pass, that after reviewing in excess of 1,400 titles that came up on PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/PubMed/) when I submitted the relevant keywords (deglutition + volume or viscosity, not esophagus), I quickly determined that this was not going to be so straight forward. Obviously, certain citations were quickly eliminated because they were not in reference to normal, healthy adults, but nonetheless, the length of the list was still impressive. However, one should not confuse quantity with quality or with suitability. The list was long, but that did not necessarily mean that the information provided was germane to the work of a speech-language pathologist. And so, almost one full day was devoted to selecting articles of relevance. From there it was a case of narrowing the appropriate list to one that was manageable for the space allocated to this article. I selected 15 citations that appeared representative of the present state of our knowledge as it applies to the various methods of investigation of the oral and/or pharyngeal stages of the swallow. Five references regarding viscosity measurement were also selected.
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