1999 Dysphagia Research Society Excerpts The following are excerpts from a few abstracts of papers delivered during the 1999 Dysphagia Research Society in Burlington, VT. I hope you will find them of interest and may consider attending the 2000 Dysphagia Research Society, which will be held in Savannah, Georgia, October 26–28, 2000. Please see ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2000
1999 Dysphagia Research Society Excerpts
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cathy Lazarus
    Northwestern University, Chicago
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2000
1999 Dysphagia Research Society Excerpts
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 2000, Vol. 9, 3. doi:10.1044/sasd9.3.3
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 2000, Vol. 9, 3. doi:10.1044/sasd9.3.3
The following are excerpts from a few abstracts of papers delivered during the 1999 Dysphagia Research Society in Burlington, VT. I hope you will find them of interest and may consider attending the 2000 Dysphagia Research Society, which will be held in Savannah, Georgia, October 26–28, 2000. Please see some of the highlights for this meeting in the Editorial Column.
The Relationship Between Dysphagia and Unresponsive Asthma in the Pediatric Population
L. Newman, L. Mabel, C. Keckley, and M. Peterson
The purpose of this study was to characterize swallowing function in children who have been referred for a dysphagia evaluation with asthma and suboptimal response to bronchodilators and antiinflammatory therapy. Modified barium swallow (MBS) studies and medical histories were reviewed in 22 children (4 females, 18 males, mean age: 41.59 months). Swallows were analyzed for physiologic disorders and aspiration, penetration, and residue. Results revealed 82% (22) children demonstrated swallowing difficulties characterized by material in the pyriform sinuses prior to initiation of the swallow. Fourteen (78%) exhibited laryngeal penetration and 5 (28%) aspirated. There was a significant relationship between spillover/pharyngeal delay and laryngeal penetration. Two (11%) demonstrated nasopharyngeal backflow. There were no significant relationships between neurologic disorders, history of pneumonia and GER with laryngeal penetration, aspiration and/or nasopharyngeal backflow. These authors conclude that aspiration of material may produce asthmatic symptoms in pediatric patients and swallowing dysfunction must be considered in the treatment of asthma.
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