State of the Science Treatment maneuvers with patients who have oropharyngeal dysphagia frequently are centered around improvement in motor performance, either in strength (more effort), range of motion, and/or coordination. It is often difficult to judge the patient’s performance and improvement in these tasks unless there are objective measures of change. Further, some ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 1999
State of the Science
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Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / State of the Science
Article   |   July 01, 1999
State of the Science
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), July 1999, Vol. 8, 4-5. doi:10.1044/sasd8.2.4
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), July 1999, Vol. 8, 4-5. doi:10.1044/sasd8.2.4
Treatment maneuvers with patients who have oropharyngeal dysphagia frequently are centered around improvement in motor performance, either in strength (more effort), range of motion, and/or coordination. It is often difficult to judge the patient’s performance and improvement in these tasks unless there are objective measures of change. Further, some tasks may be too abstract for learning unless the patient receives immediate feedback on their performance. The use of portable biofeedback units that are capable of measuring and storing information about motor performance and providing the patient this information immediately may be useful as a method of enhancing the learning of desired swallowing sequences.
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