Clever Clinical Clips Treating patients with dysphagia at bedside is always beset with problems. Not the least of these is how to keep the patient in good neutral head position, or chin tuck posture when appropriate, while the clinician is hovering over the patient. Most hospitals and skilled nursing facilities provide a ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 1998
Clever Clinical Clips
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Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Clever Clinical Clips
Article   |   October 01, 1998
Clever Clinical Clips
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 1998, Vol. 7, 23. doi:10.1044/sasd7.3.23
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 1998, Vol. 7, 23. doi:10.1044/sasd7.3.23
Treating patients with dysphagia at bedside is always beset with problems. Not the least of these is how to keep the patient in good neutral head position, or chin tuck posture when appropriate, while the clinician is hovering over the patient. Most hospitals and skilled nursing facilities provide a comfortable armchair at the patient's bedside. The chairs are generally too low, the arms are too narrow, too hard and usually slope in such a way as to place the clinician at serious risk of injury. Attempts to purloin treatment stools from the physical therapy department, even just for mealtime, are usually met with grumbling and coarse remarks. Further, treatment stools are heavy and difficult to manage while balancing a meal tray.
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