Outcomes/Quality Assurance Many times our treatment outcomes are dependent on the tests we choose to guide those treatments. One must ask, “How good are our tests at measuring swallowing function?” “How useful are our tests in providing prognostic information?” “Is the patient any better off for have undergone specialized testing for ... Article
Article  |   May 01, 1998
Outcomes/Quality Assurance
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Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Outcomes/Quality Assurance
Article   |   May 01, 1998
Outcomes/Quality Assurance
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), May 1998, Vol. 7, 4-6. doi:10.1044/sasd7.1.4
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), May 1998, Vol. 7, 4-6. doi:10.1044/sasd7.1.4
Many times our treatment outcomes are dependent on the tests we choose to guide those treatments. One must ask, “How good are our tests at measuring swallowing function?” “How useful are our tests in providing prognostic information?” “Is the patient any better off for have undergone specialized testing for swallowing function?” It is not unusual for me to be asked which test I prefer, videofluoroscopy or fiberoptic endoscopy? I usually answer that I try to select tests based on decisions related to the patient's problem and how best to define that problem. Obviously, both tests give information about deglutition, but different types of information. Knowing what type of information you want and why you want it should lead to better outcomes.
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