Clinical Issues: So You Want to do a Swallow Study… The late Martin W. Donner, former editor-in chief of Dysphagia, offered these words of wisdom in his first editorial for this journal's premier issue: “Dysphagia is not a disease. Rather, it is a symptom of disease that may be affecting any part of the swallowing tract from the mouth ... Clinical Issues
Clinical Issues  |   August 01, 1997
Clinical Issues: So You Want to do a Swallow Study…
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Judith Kulpa
    Center for Communication and Swallowing Disorders, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
  • Andrew J. Taylor
    Department of Radiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
Article Information
Clinical Issues
Clinical Issues   |   August 01, 1997
Clinical Issues: So You Want to do a Swallow Study…
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), August 1997, Vol. 6, 6-7. doi:10.1044/sasd6.2.6
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), August 1997, Vol. 6, 6-7. doi:10.1044/sasd6.2.6
The late Martin W. Donner, former editor-in chief of Dysphagia, offered these words of wisdom in his first editorial for this journal's premier issue: “Dysphagia is not a disease. Rather, it is a symptom of disease that may be affecting any part of the swallowing tract from the mouth to the stomach. As such, its proper diagnosis—and often its management—requires the collaboration of several specialists.” This article focuses on the concept of collaboration as it relates to the various members of the Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia) special interest division of ASHA.
To the physician, “collaboration” has historically meant serving as a consultant to another physician or team of physicians. To the speech-language pathologist, “collaboration” often meant working with physical and occupational therapy in a rehabilitation setting. However, the great strides in diagnosis and treatment of swallowing disorders over the past quarter century have brought new relations and a new meaning to “collaboration.” The videofluorographic (videofluoroscopic) examination of the upper alimentary tract, a.k.a. swallow study has become the cornerstone in the dysphagia workup. Thus, the speech-language pathologist and radiologist have been professionally wedded in the performance of this pivotal exam. Each professional brings respective strengths to the swallow study. The patient is the benefactor when each branch blends together synergistically. A demonstrable respect mixed with professional rapport results in a seamless examination provided to the patient. Conversely, both professional groups have much to benefit from sharing their respective specialties' needs to supplant the traditional separate educational and clinical tracks.
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