Overview of Results From the Largest Clinical Trial for Dysphagia Treatment Efficacy Abstract: Abstract  Information presented herein provides an overview of the largest randomized clinical trial ever completed in dysphagia. The two-part sequential randomized clinical trial studied the effect of two common ... Article
Article  |   June 2008
Overview of Results From the Largest Clinical Trial for Dysphagia Treatment Efficacy
Author Notes
  • © 2008 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging
Article   |   June 2008
Overview of Results From the Largest Clinical Trial for Dysphagia Treatment Efficacy
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), June 2008, Vol. 17, 59-66. doi:10.1044/sasd17.2.59
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), June 2008, Vol. 17, 59-66. doi:10.1044/sasd17.2.59
Abstract:

Abstract  Information presented herein provides an overview of the largest randomized clinical trial ever completed in dysphagia. The two-part sequential randomized clinical trial studied the effect of two common dysphagia interventions (chin tuck and thickened liquids) for immediate prevention of aspiration during videofluorographic assessment and also for the incidence of pneumonia at 3-months for patients with Parkinson’s disease and/or dementia. Results indicated that thickened liquids (nectar-thick or honey-thick) prevented aspiration during the radiographic study more frequently than chin-down posture; however, both interventions were equally successful at preventing pneumonia. Adverse events such as urinary tract infection and dehydration were more common with thickened liquids. Median length of hospital stay due to pneumonia was three times longer for patients drinking honey-thick liquids compared to nectar-thick and chin-tuck arms of the study. Several important secondary outcomes are discussed as well as implications for clinical practice. The reader is encouraged to refer to other published works for detailed information that is highlighted in this overview.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to acknowledge colleagues from the Communication Sciences and Disorders Clinical Trials Research Group: Jeri Logemann, Anne Lindblad, Gary Gensler, Diane Brandt, and Patricia Gardner and also the many clinicians who participated in this clinical trial.
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