A Discussion of Radiation in Videofluoroscopic Swallow Studies The use of X-rays in medicine is well established. However, the past few decades have seen increasing public and professional concern regarding the biological effects of low levels of radiation, particularly of possible risks from the rapidly increasing numbers of medical irradiations received as part of the medical diagnostic ... Article
Article  |   October 2004
A Discussion of Radiation in Videofluoroscopic Swallow Studies
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lisa C. Lemen
    Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Articles
Article   |   October 2004
A Discussion of Radiation in Videofluoroscopic Swallow Studies
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 2004, Vol. 13, 5-13. doi:10.1044/sasd13.3.5
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 2004, Vol. 13, 5-13. doi:10.1044/sasd13.3.5
The use of X-rays in medicine is well established. However, the past few decades have seen increasing public and professional concern regarding the biological effects of low levels of radiation, particularly of possible risks from the rapidly increasing numbers of medical irradiations received as part of the medical diagnostic process. Much of the public concern is for its use in screening asymptomatic populations—such as mammography—but there has been considerable scrutiny of other procedures as well in efforts to improve the overall standard of the imaging exams (examples: American College of Radiology accreditation programs, Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Organization standards, National Evaluation of X-ray Trends surveys). As part of the expansion of x-ray technology into new diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, the study of how x-rays interact within biological tissue has led to improvements in both equipment and in procedures aimed at reducing unnecessary and unintentional exposures, while maximizing the diagnostic information obtained. However, it is still “essential that all personnel professionally involved with the use of medical radiation develop an understanding of the risks involved, and of methods for minimizing them without compromising medical benefits” (Webster, 1980, preface). This statement was originally aimed at medical physicists, but is equally applicable to individuals from non-radiology clinical disciplines who are becoming much more involved in using radiological imaging methods as an integral part of their specific diagnostic protocols.
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