Radiation Safety During the Videofluoroscopic Swallow Study: The Adult Exam Radiation safety for the dysphagia clinician conducting a videofluoroscopic swallow study (VFSS) is an important topic that deserves our full professional attention. The basic scientific principles underlying radiation safety guidelines are not difficult to understand and should be taught during graduate dysphagia course work and reinforced in the workplace. ... Article
Article  |   October 2004
Radiation Safety During the Videofluoroscopic Swallow Study: The Adult Exam
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lisa N. Kelchner
    University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH
  • Copyright © 2004 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Articles
Article   |   October 2004
Radiation Safety During the Videofluoroscopic Swallow Study: The Adult Exam
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 2004, Vol. 13, 24-28. doi:10.1044/sasd13.3.24
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 2004, Vol. 13, 24-28. doi:10.1044/sasd13.3.24
Radiation safety for the dysphagia clinician conducting a videofluoroscopic swallow study (VFSS) is an important topic that deserves our full professional attention. The basic scientific principles underlying radiation safety guidelines are not difficult to understand and should be taught during graduate dysphagia course work and reinforced in the workplace. Such educational recommendations and guidelines are now appropriately incorporated in at least two Special Interest Division 13 documents (ASHA, 2003, 2004); however, individual clinician consideration of these recommendations is difficult to determine. During a presentation on this topic during the 1998 Ohio Speech Language and Hearing Convention, a colleague and I conducted an informal polling of clinicians that revealed poor and inconsistent knowledge of basic radiation safety across the 50 participants (Kelchner & Waddell, 1998). The explanation for this was related to the number of graduate programs that had a designated dysphagia course at that time. In addition, formal training in radiation safety in the workplace was reported to be inconsistent, with some facilities providing comprehensive education and monitoring, while others did substantially less. Unfortunately, current conversations with clinicians suggest that a variation in levels of understanding and practice of radiation safety persists. The dedication of the current issue of Perspectives to this topic is timely and needed. In addition, the information and survey results reported in this issue are likely to influence future education in this area.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia) content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.